IMPORTANT SITE ANNOUNCEMENT


IMPORTANT SITE ANNOUNCEMENT


The Bodyweight666 and other programs offered here are no longer supported. The site will remain live for the time being but you can find the new and updated strength training program and bodyweight progressions at: STARTBODYWEIGHT.COM




Tuesday, 19 June 2012

Dip progression


Dips provide an excellent upper body workout, and you should make them a staple of your training program. They primarily work the muscles in the back of your arms (triceps), but also the front of your shoulders (anterior deltoids), your chest (pectorals) and your back muscles (rhomboid).

The following progression takes youfurther than a standard dip, and on your way towards a muscle up (which is a pull up and a dip combined). Once you want to attempt Russian dips, you will need parallel bars, and a single bar for single bar dips.

With a bit of resourcefulness, the progression can still be followed even without a dip bar: how to do dips without dip bars.

Start at whichever point of the progression  is relevant to you.
Unless otherwise indicated, you should be aiming to complete 6 sets of 6 repetitions of the given exercise within a workout.
The first set is a warm up set: go back two or three levels in the progression and perform that variation for 6 reps. 

Perform each following set ‘to failure’ (e.g. 6,6,5,5,4).  


In each new workout, you should aim to improve on the number of reps you performed previously by at least 1, e.g.: (6,6,5,5,4) (6,6,6,5,4) 

Once you manage 6 sets of 6 reps, you are ready to move on to the next variation in the progression.


If you find yourself not progressing any longer, take a few rest days, then resume training.


dip progression
 1. Bent knee bench dips. Place your hands flat on a bench or chair behind you, and lower yourself until your butt nearly touches the floor. Lower yourself over the count of 3 seconds. Breathe out as you push yourself back up.






 

dip progression
 2. Straight legs bench dips. Same as above but performed with straight legs. 3 seconds on the way down.







dip progression
 3. One elevated leg, straight legs bench dips. Raise one of your legs off the floor. 3 seconds on the way down.









dip progression
4. Elevated legs bench dips. 3 seconds on the way down.








dip progression
 5. Legs on the floor dips (assisted dips). Perform these in between two chairs (or on dip bars). Allow your feet to rest on the floor behind you, and try to use minimal assistance from your legs when pushing yourself back up. 3 seconds on the way down.







dip progression
 This is the same exercise as above but performed on a dips station by using a bench behind me for assistance.

dip progression
 6. One leg on the floor, one leg in the air dips. Same as above, but reducing the assistance you can from your legs by using only one leg. 3 seconds on the way down.








dip progression
 Same as above again, but on a dips station.










dip progression
7. Jumping and eccentric dips. Jump into the dip position, then lower yourself over 3 seconds. When you reach the bottom position, place your feet on the floor and jump back up. You are merely concerned with the eccentric phase of the movement.





dip progression









dip progression
8. Dips. Lower yourself between two chairs or parallel bars, feet off the floor, then push back to the starting position.







dip progression
 Same as above, on a dips station.












dip progression
9. Legs forward dip. This movement slightly changes the mechanics of the exercise, but it is a key step in the progression towards a muscle up: once in the top dip position, raise you knees so that your legs would be in front of you, rather than behind you throughout the dipping motion.

dip progression
 10. Modified Russian dips. Having lowered yourself in the 'legs forward dip' position, carry on getting lower until your forarms are parallel with the floor. This might place a bit of strain on your wrists, but it closely mimicks the middle portion of a muscle up. It also forces you to dip lower than you might have done until now.






chicken dips
11. Russian dips (a.k.a. chicken dips) From the'legs forward dip' position, lower yourself all the way until your upper arms rest on the dip bars. Then pull yourself back up, helping yourself by bringing your head and torso forward.





dip progression
12. Single bar dips. Lower yourself  on a single bar until the bar is level with your nipples. This effectively reflects the often neglected middle portion of a muscle up.

5 comments:

  1. what if you don't have dip station? What are alternatives?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Is it humanly possible to do a one-armed dip?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8lu2c3E3NSc

      Delete
    2. Not very easily, then ;-)

      Delete
  3. I love your progressions, and they've helped me stay strong (and get stronger) since I lost access to a gym. Last time I tried the dip progression, I injured my shoulder when I moved to stage 7 (the first time I tried it -- I tried each stage once to assess where I was, and then progressed to the next one since I could do the max number of reps and sets with what I thought was good form -- after the injury, I discovered I was wrong about my form). I got through stage 7 okay, until the last rep of the last set, when the shoulder started hurting.

    I've rehabbed my shoulder and am working on regaining flexibility. I'm back to jumping pull-ups, regular push-ups, and military handstand push-ups, so I'm considering trying dips again. I've read a bit about how to do dips safely, and many sites warn against doing bench dips if you've had a shoulder injury. I'm a little scared to try the progressions here again given my history (I know I rushed through the stages too fast last time and didn't have good form, so I'm not blaming your program -- but you start with bench dips, and they're considered very stressful on the shoulders). Do you have any recommendations on how to get back into dips that's gentler on the shoulders?

    ReplyDelete