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Wednesday, 4 July 2012

Handstand push up progression


hand stand push-up
Handstand push ups provide an excellent bodyweight workout for the shoulders. They primarily work your anterior and lateral deltoids and the muscles in the back of your arms (your triceps). They also engage the muscles of the upper back (the trapezius).

Handstand push ups also help building up towards unsupported handstands. A strong core and strong shoulders will help you find your balance and maintain the position more easily.

Start at whichever point of this progression  is relevant to you.

Unless otherwise indicated, you should be aiming to complete 6 sets of 6 repetitions of the given exercise within a workout.  
The first set is a warm up set: go back two or three levels in the progression and perform that variation for 6 reps. 
Perform each following set ‘to failure’ (e.g. 6,6,5,5,4).  

In each new workout, you should aim to improve on the number of reps you performed previously by at least 1, e.g.: (6,6,5,5,4) (6,6,6,5,4) 
Once you manage 6 sets of 6 reps, you are ready to move on to the next variation in the progression.


If you find yourself not progressing any longer, take a few rest days, then resume training.

handstand push up progression
 1. Military press push ups with raised platform. Place your hands shoulder-width apart on a raised platform. Bend at the waist keeping a straight back, and bring your head to your hands. Exhale as you push back up.





handstand push up progression
2. Chinese push ups with raised platform. Place your hands with thumbs and index fingers touching each other,  on a raised platform. Bend at the waist keeping a straight back, and bring your head to your hands.






handstand push up progression
 3. Military press push ups. Same as above, without the platform. Make sure that your head travels directly between your arms. Try to keep your head, arms and torso all in the same straight line.






handstand push up progression
4. Chinese push ups. Same as above without the platform.








handstand push up progression
 5. Decline military press push ups. Same as above with feet on a raised platform, and hands on the floor.







handstand push up progression
 6. Decline Chinese push ups. Same as above with feet on a raised platform, and hands on the floor.







handstand push up progression
 7. Wall handstand. Aim to hold the position for 5 sets of 30 seconds. Can also be performed with your back to the wall, but preferably facing the wall. To get into the position, crouch some distance away from the wall, and walk your feet up the wal keeping your arms straight. Then gradually walk you hands closer to the wall. To get out, either roll forward, making sure you tuck your chin into your chest so as not to bang your head on the floor, or walk your hands away from the wall, before bringing your feet down.




handstand push up progression
Wall handstand performed with back to the wall.










handstand push up progression
8. Wall bent waist handstand push up. Walk your feet up the wall, keep a bent waist (you will need to remain some distance from the wall), then perform a push up. Make sure your head and torso remain in line with your arms.





handstand push up progression
9. Half wall handstand push ups. Facing the wall in a handstand position, lower yourself till your arms are half bent, then come up.









handstand push up progression
10. Wall handstand push ups. Lower yourself all the way down, until your head touches the ground.









handstand push up progression
11. Wall close handstand push ups. Same as wall handstand push ups, but with your hands in the ‘diamond’ position.

    18 comments:

    1. Awesome progression! Thanks!

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    2. now to learn a one handed handstand.......

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    3. Are the push ups here easier than normal push ups?Plus,is a wall handstand supposedly harder than an unsupported headstand?Thanks!

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      Replies
      1. For most people, these push ups will feel harder than standard push ups. And yes, a wall handstand usually feels harder than a headstand, even if unsupported.

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      2. Thank you very much.

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    4. why do the photos look so messedu p?

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    5. Do you know the exercise names in fitocracy for the military push ups?

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      Replies
      1. Log them as 'Standing military press'. For incline military press push ups, use 30% of your bodyweight as the weight lifted, 50% for standard military press push ups, and 70% for decline military press push ups.

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    6. I feel like I might lack the flexibility for the earlier progressions. Is that a possibility, and is there a way to modify them or should I be working on something else (or am I just doing them wrong). I wish their was a video for these, as they are the only one of the six progressions I feel like I haven't seen/can't find other info about online.

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      Replies
      1. google "pike push ups". You'll find lots of demonstrations.

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    7. I'm on step 6, the decline chinese, and towards the bottom of the motion in later sets one or both of my shoulders is 'popping', like it wants to dislocate. I still feel like I can push back up just fine, but it's weird and I'm wondering if I should be concerned, or if there's something I should work on strengthening in a different way?

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      Replies
      1. I'd strongly suggest you see a physiotherapist about this. It sounds like you have some shoulder instability issue, and it's going to be virtually impossible to give youadvice without seeing you in person. The last thing you want is to dislocate your shoulder, as it will take weeks to recover.

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      2. Thanks. I'll find someone local to talk to :) Good thing is they don't hurt today. My triceps, on the other hand....

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    8. I have the same 'popping' problem too. I don't have any history of shoulder problems, so it's a bit puzzling. Is there any alternative to the Chinese decline? Thanks for all your routines, btw. They're awesome!

      Kev

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      Replies
      1. If it's only the close-hand version that's giving you trouble, then skip it all together.

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    9. how much rest in between each set ?

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      Replies
      1. Between one and 3 mins depending on whether you are trying to improve pure strength (3 mins) or strength endurance (1 min).

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